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An historic strength of the master’s programs is a focus on basic and applied research that has relevance, the ability to engage with important psychological issues, and the potential to inform or translate into interventions and policy. The master’s programs in psychology provide a comprehensive and thorough grounding in psychology. Small interactive seminar-style classes survey the foundations of psychological theory and contemporary research, and explore the core areas of attitudes, interpersonal processes, and group processes and intergroup relations. These classes are supplemented by electives that focus on specific topics in psychology. The programs emphasize the development of methodological and statistical skills early on, which quickly positions students to excel as researchers.

Throughout the program, we emphasize the integration of scientific psychology and professional practice through attention to didactic and experiential learning, synthesizing skill acquisition with effective use of self, and clarifying personal and professional identities. Thus the specific goals of the program and their associated competencies prepare students to work in a variety of settings with emphasis on health and related agencies. With the help of a Faculty Advisor, students register for required and elective courses, which, in light of their previous preparation, special needs, and career objectives, will prepare them appropriately.

 

 

Applied Social Psychology

Applied social psychology combines the science of social psychology with the focus at a wide range of social topics. This exciting program provides a thorough explanation of how social psychologists can contribute to the understanding and management of different social problems encountered in the fields of physical and mental health, integration and immigration issues, gender issues, organizational issues, economic behavior, political behavior, environmental behavior, and education. Social psychologists are trained to combine their knowledge of human behavior with scientific research methods and the empirical study of social phenomena; how social influence, social perception, social interaction, non-verbal behavior, conformity, aggression, andprejudice influence individual and group behavior.

 

 



1. Semester
2. Semester
3. Semester
4. Semester
5. Semester
6. Semester
7. Semester
8. Semester

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COURSE NAME
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MSPSY500 
Current Issues in Social and Applied Psychology 

MSPSY501 
Applied Social Psychology 

MSPSY502 
Advanced Organizational Psychology 

MSPSY503 
Advanced Topics in Inter-group Relations 

MSPSY504 
Advanced Health Psychology: Psychosocial Processes in Health and Illness 

Total
 
 
 
15


CODE
COURSE NAME
T
P
C

MSPSY505 
Advanced Developmental Social Psychology 

MSPSY506 
Research Methods for Social Psychology 

MSPSY507 
Advanced Statistics for Social Studies 

MSPSY... 
Elective Course 

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12


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COURSE NAME
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P
C

MSPSY515 
Master's Thesis 

Total
 
 
 
0


CODE
COURSE NAME
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P
C

MSPSY515 
Master's Thesis 

Total
 
 
 
0


CODE
COURSE NAME
T
P
C

Total
 
 
 
0


CODE
COURSE NAME
T
P
C

Total
 
 
 
0


CODE
COURSE NAME
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Total
 
 
 
0


CODE
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Total
 
 
 
0




+-Course Descriptions

Master Degree in Psychology

An historic strength of the master’s programs is a focus on basic and applied research that has relevance, the ability to engage with important psychological issues, and the potential to inform or translate into interventions and policy.  The master’s programs in psychology provide a comprehensive and thorough grounding in psychology.  Small interactive seminar-style classes survey the foundations of psychological theory and contemporary research, and explore the core areas of attitudes, interpersonal processes, and group processes and intergroup relations.  These classes are supplemented by electives that focus on specific topics in psychology.  The programs emphasize the development of methodological and statistical skills early on, which quickly positions students to excel as researchers.

 

Throughout the program, we emphasize the integration of scientific psychology and professional practice through attention to didactic and experiential learning, synthesizing skill acquisition with effective use of self, and clarifying personal and professional identities.  Thus the specific goals of the program and their associated competencies prepare students to work in a variety of settings with emphasis on health and related agencies.  With the help of a Faculty Advisor, students register for required and elective courses, which, in light of their previous preparation, special needs, and career objectives, will prepare them appropriately.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Applied Social Psychology

Applied social psychology combines the science of social psychology with the focus at a wide range of social topics.  This exciting program provides a thorough explanation of how social psychologists can contribute to the understanding and management of different social problems encountered in the fields of physical and mental health, integration and immigration issues, gender issues, organizational issues, economic behavior, political behavior, environmental behavior, and education.  Social psychologists are trained to combine their knowledge of human behavior with scientific research methods and the empirical study of social phenomena; how social influence, social perception, social interaction, non-verbal behavior, conformity, aggression, and prejudice influence individual and group behavior.

 

 

 

Core Courses:

Year 1: Fall Semester

MSPSY500 (3,0)3 Current Issues in Social and Applied Psychology

MSPSY501 (3,0)3 Applied Social Psychology

MSPSY502 (3,0)3 Advanced Organizational Psychology

MSPSY503 (3,0)3 Advanced Topics in Inter-group Relations

MSPSY504 (3,0)3 Advanced Health Psychology: Psychosocial Processes in Health and Illness

 

Year 1: Spring Semester

MSPSY505 (3,0)3 Advanced Developmental Social Psychology

MSPSY506 (3,0)3 Research Methods for Social Psychology

MSPSY507 (3,0)3 Advanced Statistics for Social Studies

MSPSY… (3,0)3 Elective Course

 

Year 2: Fall Semester

MSPSY515 Master’s Thesis

 

Year 2: Spring Semester

MSPSY515 Master’s Thesis

 

Elective Courses:

MSPSY508 (3,0)3 Advanced Topics in Group Processes and Inter-group Relations: a Bio-social Perspective

MSPSY509 (3,0)3 Social Psychology of the Media

MSPSY510 (3,0)3 Psychology of Human Resource Development

MSPSY511 (3,0)3 Psychology of Criminal Conduct

MSPSY512 (3,0)3 Cognition and Culture

MSPSY513 (3,0)3 Advanced Topics in Personal relationships

MSPSY514 (3,0)3 Social Psychology of Economic Life

MSPSY (3,0)3 Social Psychology of Gender

 

 

 

Course Description

MSPSY500 (3,0)3 Current Issues in Social and Applied Psychology

This course will deal with the conceptual frameworks offered by social psychology and the ways in which social psychology can be applied.  It will explore important conceptual issues, including the levels of analysis we adopt, the nature of social knowledge, the self in social psychology, social influence, social cognition and attitude change, discourse analysis, the social psychology of language, and the theory of applied social psychology.  This module will also deal with implementing social psychological theory and method in applied settings.  These include organizational psychology, dealing with media coverage, equal opportunities issues, ethics, environmental design, terrorism, and discussing related psychological findings.

 

MSPSY501 (3,0)3 Applied Social Psychology

This module will discuss, at advanced level: the cognitive system, conceptual systems, expectation, explanation processes, decision making.  Motivation, self-regulating systems, goal setting, evaluation, feelings and emotions; the interpersonal system, interdependence, competence and emotional intelligence, social support, conflict and negotiation, interpersonal communication; and groups, and cultural systems, group conflict, social identification and culture.

 

 

 

MSPSY502 (3,0)3 Advanced Organizational Psychology

This module will include the following topics: theories of organization including classical, human relations, structural and systems models; organizational development and organizational transformation, organizational change and change management, organizational culture and organizational climate; diversity in the workplace, organizational learning, organizations as complex systems; and organizational consultancy, leadership, and organizational behavior.

 

MSPSY503 (3,0)3 Advanced Topics in Inter-group Relations

This module will examine advanced theory and research in intergroup relations.  We will consider the nature of social categorization processes and how stereotypes develop, persist and change.  The module will then examine the relationship between intergroup perceptions and prejudice, and how intergroup relationships influence both variables.  The module will examine how and why stereotypes and prejudice become manifested as discrimination and intergroup conflict, and then how groups become mobilized to perform collective action.  We will study the motivational and social elements in intergroup relationships, social identity as a group member, and how these issues can be studied both in the laboratory and in real world settings

 

MSPSY504 (3,0)3 Advanced Health Psychology: Psychosocial Processes in Health and Illness

It is well established that health outcomes such as morbidity and mortality are strongly influenced by input variables such as age, gender, class and education.  What is less clear is how those inputs and outcomes are linked - that is the mechanisms and processes that mediate and moderate the relationships.  Evidence has pointed to the importance of psychological processes, and the purpose of the module will be to explore the evidence in detail in an attempt to determine some of the causal links.  The traditional areas of health psychology will thus be introduced within one explanatory framework which attempts to link the areas together rather than to treat them separately.  The main areas for discussion will be as follows: defining health; social inequalities in health; life events and social support; knowledge, information, and communication; cognitive dispositions, including personal control and attitudes; stress and coping; appropriate and inappropriate behaviors.  The module will also include a range of psychological and health principles will be examined within the context of formulating treatment and evaluation proposals or prevention programs designed to change social behaviors in relation to health issues, such as stress and coping strategies, drug and alcohol abuse, sexual behaviors, exercise and nutrition, and aged care.

 

MSPSY505 (3,0)3 Advanced Developmental Social Psychology

Advanced Developmental Social Psychology aims to provide students with a strong understanding of the theoretical accounts of major issues within the field of developmental social psychology (e.g. prejudice and stereotype development).  Students will critically review recent research into the development of social cognition, with a focus on the theoretical integration of concepts from developmental psychology and social psychology, and the applied implication of the research under review.  These Masters students should gain an in-depth understanding of children`s social development and how this knowledge can inform educational practice.

 

MSPSY506 (3,0)3 Research Methods for Social Psychology

This module will concentrate on the methodological definitions and related issues in Social Sciences and include validity and reliability in measurement; experimental, quasi experimental and correlational research designs in the laboratory and field; observational, archival, and qualitative research methodologies; and the problem of bias in psychological research.

 

 

MSPSY507 (3,0)3 Advanced Statistics for Social Studies

The aim of this module is to provide a postgraduate-level orientation to both basic and advanced contemporary statistical issues in psychology.  The statistical techniques taught will include univariate and bivariate descriptive and inferential statistics; psychometric techniques; exploratory data analysis; basic and advanced topics in ANOVA and ANCOVA; multiple regression; factor analysis; and structural equation modeling.

 

 

MSPSY508 (3,0)3 Advanced Topics in Group Processes and Inter-group Relations: a bio-social perspective

This module will provide an opportunity to study at an advanced level the literature on group processes and intergroup relations and to familiarize oneself with the current social and evolutionary perspectives on groups.  The module builds upon knowledge of social psychology and biological psychology gained at undergraduate level.  We shall consider, specifically, how social psychological and evolutionary theories in combination can explain group processes.  Topics that will be addressed include group cohesion, intragroup and intergroup conflict, status and leadership, and group size.  The module draws primarily on small group research in social and evolutionary psychology, but we shall also consider perspectives from other fields, such as economics and anthropology.  This module will involve a great deal of student presentation, participation and discussion.

 

MSPSY509 (3,0)3 Social Psychology of the Media

The course is designed to encourage a critical attitude to the media and will consider their influence on individuals and society in general.  Throughout the course, the following concerns will be addressed: the nature of communication and problems in defining its effectiveness; the role of the media in providing information to its audience; the ideological functions of the media; media representations of minority groups or controversial issues and how these may influence people’s attitudes.  The topics which will be discussed include: conceptualizations of the media in terms of a system in context, and in terms of communication; interpretation of contents and effects; the power and social context of the media; conflicting views on children in the media; children as an active audience; drama and story-telling in the media: cultural products; case studies of television drama production; images of blackness on television, perpetuating stereotypes; propaganda through the media: war propaganda, election campaigns, encouragement of stereotypes; presentation techniques: diffusion of messages, mediation of myths; publicity and advertising: contexts, methods and mechanisms; creating social reality: the process of news selection and construction; the ideology of impartiality and balance.

 

 

MSPSY510 (3,0)3 Psychology of Human Resource development

This module will analyze the HRM context from the perspective of social psychology.  The topics will include: employee relations, employment law and the management of human resources; the employee voice in union and non-union organizations; recruitment and selection; performance management and reward systems; work systems and human resource policy options.

 

 

MSPSY511 (3,0)3 Psychology of Criminal Conduct

This module will examine the topic of criminality from a broadly social psychological perspective.  The evidence that consistent criminal tendencies can be reliably assessed is considered, and the extent to which personality factors can explain that consistency is evaluated.  The concept of psychopathy will be explored before examining more generally the relationship between crime, law and moral judgment.  Theoretical perspectives on the origins of the criminal tendency in childhood will be detailed and its abundant expression in adolescence highlighted and examined.  The current emphasis on crime as reasoned action will be evaluated, highlighting the role of rationalization and normative beliefs in the justification of both "blue-collar" and "white-collar" crime.  The role of opportunism in criminal decision-making will be considered in relation to environmental factors and attempts to prevent crime.  The role of victims in creating, defining and reporting crime will be analyzed, and the psychological consequences of crime for victims and potential victims are explored.

 

MSPSY512 (3,0)3 Cognition and Culture

This module analyses how individual minds deploy in richly structured contexts - communities, regions, ethnicities, cultures, nation-states, etc. and aims for an improved understanding of thought which requires description at both the psychological and cultural levels, and of how phenomena at the two levels interact.  Major areas of discussion in this module will include: cross-cultural differences in reasoning, perception, and memory; culture and emotion; evolution and culture; domain-specific/modular approaches to cognitive architecture; culture and development; the epidemiology of representations.

 

MSPSY513 (3,0)3 Advanced Topics in Personal Relationships

The course will offer the student the opportunity for in depth study of a major topic area in the field of personal relationships.  The list of topics will be revised frequently in order to ensure that it includes the most currently active and interesting issues within the field.  Topics scheduled to discuss at present are: romantic love, sociobiological approaches to attraction and mate selection, loneliness, adult attachment and social support.

 

MSPSY514 (3,0)3 The Social Psychology of Economic Life

The course will review the contribution of social psychological theories and perspectives, broadly interpreted to include micro-sociology, to the understanding of people’s representations, attitudes, choices and behaviors in the economic sphere.  Rationality in individual and collective decision taking; The scientific and lay representations of risk; trust in contemporary society; consumer behavior, fashion and the symbolic aspects of consumption; and equity and justice are amongst the topics to be discussed on this course.

 

Counseling Psychology

Counseling psychology focuses on providing therapeutic treatments to clients who experience a wide variety of symptoms, and it is one of the largest specialty areas within psychology that facilitates personal and interpersonal functioning across the life span with a focus on emotional, social, vocational, educational, health-related, developmental and organizational concerns.  The graduate school of social sciences recognizes the importance of preparing graduates who manifest the highest standards of excellence in academic or service delivery settings through the integration of theory, research, and practice, and with sensitivity to multicultural issues. This specialty encompasses a broad range of practices that is unique in its attention both to normal developmental issues and to problems associated with physical, emotional, and mental disorders.  Thus, students are continuously exposed to opportunities to examine the connection between scientific knowledge and professional practice.  To highlight the importance of this integration, education and training in theory, inquiry, and practice occur concurrently throughout the program.

 

Core Courses:

Year 1: Fall Semester

CPSY530 (3,0)3 Legal / Ethical Issues

CPSY551 (3,0)3 Psychopathology / Differential Diagnosis

CPSY552 (3,0)3 Overview of Psychotherapeutic Approaches

CPSY553 (3,0)3 Clinical Interviewing, Assessment, and Treatment Planning

CPSY562 (3,0)3 Practice Management

 

Year 1: Spring Semester

CPSY554 (3,0)3 Humanistic Therapy

CPSY555 (3,0)3 Family / Group Therapy / Organizational Dynamics

CPSY556 (3,0)3 Solution-oriented Therapy

CPSY557 (3,0)3 Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

CPSY582 (3,0)3 Supervised Psychotherapy Training

 

Year 2: Fall Semester

CPSY588 One-year Full-time Internship with Formal Supervision

CPSY515 Master’s Thesis

 

Year 2: Spring Semester

CPSY588 Continuous Internship

CPSY515 Master’s Thesis

 

 

 

Course Description

CPSY530 (3,0)3 Legal / Ethical Issues

Overview of ethical issues in clinical practice, as well as in research including designing, conducting, and presenting scientific research, covering such issues as treatment of subjects, informed consent, confidentiality, and scope of practice.  Examination of ethics in professional work, including analysis of case studies, and discussion of ethical issues on the forefront of applied science.

 

CPSY551 (3,0)3 Psychopathology / Differential Diagnosis

Review of DSM-IV-TR criteria of major psychiatric disorders, special challenges in differential diagnoses, ethical issues in use of diagnostic information, and recommended therapeutic approaches.

 

CPSY552 (3,0)3 Overview of Psychotherapeutic Approaches

Examination of the major approaches to psychotherapy practice, covering theory, techniques, and empirical support, including new developments in the field.

 

CPSY553 (3,0)3 Clinical Interviewing, Assessment, and Treatment Planning

Practical training in different approaches to conducting clinical interviews, diagnostic issues, and planning treatment with clients including issues such as extent of treatment and evaluation of results.

 

CPSY554 (3,0)3 Humanistic Therapy

In-depth theoretical examination and practical procedural training in humanistic approaches to psychotherapy practice, including diagnostic suitability, therapist and methodology variables.

 

 

 

CPSY555 (3,0)3 Family / Group Therapy / Organizational Dynamics

In-depth theoretical examination and practical procedural training in major approaches of family therapy, including diagnostic suitability, therapist and methodology variables.  Practical training in managing various types of therapy groups, and major issues in organizational dynamics.

 

CPSY556 (3,0)3 Solution-oriented Therapy

In-depth theoretical examination and practical procedural training in solution-oriented therapy, including diagnostic suitability, therapist and methodology variables.

 

CPSY557 (3,0)3 Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

In-depth theoretical examination and practical procedural training in cognitive therapy, behavior therapy, and cognitive-behavior therapy, including diagnostic suitability, therapist and methodology variables.

 

CPSY562 (3,0)3 Practice Management

Practical training in how to manage a clinical practice, in a private setting or in a clinic, including such skills as managing client load, consultations with other practitioners, administrative office and financial procedures, media issues, as well as self-management and personal lifestyle issues.